Steroids use in high school sports

Steroids can have long-lasting and sometimes irreversible side effects on the body. Anabolic steroids have been linked to increased cholesterol, stroke and blood clots, urinary and bowel problems, and problems with the musculoskeletal system. Since steroids are a hormone, much like testosterone, the effects on sex characteristics can be far reaching, causing a kind of hyper-masculinity in young men. They can also cause male-pattern baldness and shrinking of the testicles. The excess of testosterone can also have feminizing effects on young men, such as breast development. (Jerry Adler, 2004)

Awareness and educational efforts are working to help prevent anabolic steroid abuse in schools and communities. The Adolescents Training and Learning to Avoid Steroids (ATLAS) and the Athletes Targeting Healthy Exercise and Nutrition Alternatives (ATHENA) programs, funded by the NIDA, and supported by the Oregon Health & Science University programs is teaching athletes that they do not need steroids to build powerful muscles and improve athletic performance. These programs provide weight-training and nutrition alternatives, increase healthy behaviors, less likelihood to try steroids, and less likelihood to engage in other dangerous behaviors such as drinking and driving, use of marijuana and alcohol , and and improved body image. Bother Congress and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration endorsed these model prevention programs. 4

I totally understand what kind of job you had. I work at a Wally World distribution center. Started in shipping, loading about 3 to 4 full semi’s a day. Didn’t know how much weight I loaded. Then switched to non conveyable. When in dog food, I’d stack about 60k/lbs in 12 hours. That was MUCH easier than shipping. My first year, I struggled. Then I talked to my bro-in-law, who is a personal trainer, found and I started to do good. I was taking creatine and C4 prior to work, and took an Animal Pak with UniLiver every break, while eating protien every 3-4 hours. This brought me to Muscle for Life and The Books. I’m in maintenance department now, and are about to join a gym. I’ve been wanting to get the Legion multi’s and switch to Legion supplements. I’m about done reading BLS, and are gonna start the year one challenge. I’ve aready bought BBLS and Shredded Chef. I get excited every time I think about my goals.

Topical and systemic steroids have proven to be invaluable agents in the treatment of a wide range of disorders, but their use is not without potential complications. Before initiation of therapy with systemic steroids, a personal or family history of cataracts, glaucoma, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, renal stones, peptic ulceration, and current infection or pregnancy should be ascertained, because these patients have an increased risk of complications. Prior to long-term therapy with systemic steroids, blood pressure measurement, tuberculin skin test, and anergy panel are recommended. Monthly follow-up may include measurements of weight, blood pressure, electrolytes, and blood sugar and guaiac testing of the stool. To prevent the ocular complications of steroid therapy, routine screening is indicated (Table 1). Screening for cataracts, which occur most commonly as a sequela of continuous systemic steroid use, may be performed by slit-lamp examinations conducted three or four times a year for patients on long-term therapy and twice a year for patients taking intermittent topical ocular or systemic steroids. Glaucoma is more often associated with topical ocular or periocular steroids than with systemic steroids; recommended screening includes a baseline intraocular pressure measurement, then routine pressure measurements taken every few weeks initially, then every few months. Ocular rebound inflammation may develop secondary to rapid tapering or abrupt discontinuation of topical ocular steroid use and is best prevented with gradual tapering. Opportunistic infections of the eye include bacterial, viral, and fungal infections and are most often associated with the use of topical ocular steroids. Ophthalmologic evaluation is indicated promptly if patients treated with ocular steroids develop ocular discharge, pain, photophobia, or redness.

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Steroids use in high school sports

steroids use in high school sports

Topical and systemic steroids have proven to be invaluable agents in the treatment of a wide range of disorders, but their use is not without potential complications. Before initiation of therapy with systemic steroids, a personal or family history of cataracts, glaucoma, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, renal stones, peptic ulceration, and current infection or pregnancy should be ascertained, because these patients have an increased risk of complications. Prior to long-term therapy with systemic steroids, blood pressure measurement, tuberculin skin test, and anergy panel are recommended. Monthly follow-up may include measurements of weight, blood pressure, electrolytes, and blood sugar and guaiac testing of the stool. To prevent the ocular complications of steroid therapy, routine screening is indicated (Table 1). Screening for cataracts, which occur most commonly as a sequela of continuous systemic steroid use, may be performed by slit-lamp examinations conducted three or four times a year for patients on long-term therapy and twice a year for patients taking intermittent topical ocular or systemic steroids. Glaucoma is more often associated with topical ocular or periocular steroids than with systemic steroids; recommended screening includes a baseline intraocular pressure measurement, then routine pressure measurements taken every few weeks initially, then every few months. Ocular rebound inflammation may develop secondary to rapid tapering or abrupt discontinuation of topical ocular steroid use and is best prevented with gradual tapering. Opportunistic infections of the eye include bacterial, viral, and fungal infections and are most often associated with the use of topical ocular steroids. Ophthalmologic evaluation is indicated promptly if patients treated with ocular steroids develop ocular discharge, pain, photophobia, or redness.

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